Rock Guard Rescue-Avion Trailer, PT 1

We purchased our 1973 Avion in September 2016.  Quite a birthday present for me if I do say so!

Our rock guard (original to 1973) was in decent shape, with the logo faded and some stress cracks at the angle support hinge area on top.  Both of these “age-related illnesses” are ones that are very common and frequently seen in Avions especially those pre-1980’s. (you can easily see the cracks in photo below).

The previous owner to us had done a decent repair job on that right crack by reinforcing with a piece of steel behind it and filling in the crack on the outside with Parbond or something similar, but now after two years of our use we started to see the left side begin to show more of a pronounced stress crack too.

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These cracks in the solid formed hard plastic original rock guards like ours are common due to the sheer weight of the guard and the jiggling, torquing and bouncing it experiences when rolling down the road even though it is locked in at the bottom.  Hey, and our baby has done Alaska 2xs, California at least 4 times and Florida annually for at least 6 years—so after a total of 45 years and having only these cracks in her is truly not bad!

In May of 2018 we had taken our Avion out to Cayo Repair in MI to have some work done and on the punch list was to sure up that left crack to prevent further damage and to ensure that it would hold, at least for a few more years.  Chuck Cayo did a decent job with it which you can see on photo below where the rivet stud backs are showing through the horizontal piece of sandwiched steel plate.  But we knew at some point the inevitable question would have to be addressed to repair again or replace completely.

In the photo below you will also see where the two support hinges mount up underneath the top inside of the rock guard.  These hinges bear the full weight of the guard when opened (as shown) but also lock in place in the pull latches on bottom edge center of window to lock the guard in place for towing mode.  Thus all the stress is there despite the long tubular hinge that connects from the guard itself to the rig.

The photo below clearly shows the system by which the rock guard is “hung” to attach to the trailer body. (also the horizontal steel plate repair by Cayo) .The body has a receiver tube as we call it that the guard slides into from one side.

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It takes two people to effectively and safely remove or install the guard to the rig using this system.  The sheer weight of these original guards is a lot.

Newer replacement guards are being manufactured by Cayo RV Repair in MI and some other private owners these days. I believe they are made of fiberglass and therefore far lighter which is a good thing, however the ones we have seen are all black which we do not care for at all.   We prefer our muted grey which blends in with the aluminum body of the trailer better.

Here is a good photo for comparison, ours being on the left with its original as is condition, the one on the right is the fiberglass black replacement.

 

To Repair or Replace….THAT is the Question!

We knew we had only really two options with our ever growing cracks in our original existing rock guard.

  1. Bite the bullet and purchase one of the new fiberglass knockoffs (around $700-800 +S/H)
  2. Try to once again do repairs to our existing one in hopes to sure it up sufficiently for the wear and tear it would eventually get once we begin full timing in a few years.

Never Underestimate a Sunday drive to VT!

It brought us a TREASURE FIND or TWO!

One sunny Saturday in July 2018 I suggested to Kevin it would be nice to go over to nearby VT to scope out some potential campgrounds where we may wish to stay in coming years.  We like to physically see the campground and identify specific sites that we take note of for future calls for reservations.  We wanted places that would be grandkid-friendly and relatively easy to get to distance for us and for my daughter and son-in-law to drive to as they would be transporting the two grandchildren to us for a camping weekend.

Living in eastern upstate NY we can be to VT in a matter of 40 minutes.  Our trip that day took us over through Cambridge NY and then into the Bennington and Manchester VT areas of mid-state/western VT.  Using just my google map locator asking “campgrounds near me” we found several close by with no problem.  Our third one to visit though was the charm.  Not because we would want to end up camping there (no amenities, mostly all very run down, entrenched seasonals) but because on our way out the driveway Kevin shouted STOP! (I was driving) “WAIT…THERE IS AN AVION!”.  Yes, it was, abandoned and sitting among wreck, trash, bits and pieces from other trailers.  It was the campground owners graveyard of discards from two generations of ownership.  Yeah, they did not ever throw anything away!  Thank goodness!!

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We pulled off the drive and into the graveyard.  Wrangled over debris and checked her out.  Appeared to be a 1988 but the rock guard looked really, really similar in design and size to ours.  The poor rig had had a tree fall on her, breaking her center spine and was left in the graveyard to fill with rain, leaves, etc. etc. and used for storage, sort of, for perhaps a decade or more.  But the rock guard was crack free, moveable and hopefully would be ours!  We did have a tape measure with us, took measurements and tried texting and calling Cayo and posting on the Avion FB pages quickly to see if anyone could answer our question about if size of this one was same as our ’73 which of course was safely and out of reach back in NY.  A couple online FB Avioners replied they thought it would fit, but if the price was right, even if it did not fit ours, there was surely a market to sell it to another Avion owner who could use it.  That was enough security for us!

The owner of the campground came by driving his backhoe to gawk at these unfamiliars climbing around his Avion.  No worries, nice guy and Kevin quickly sparked up a perfect, nonthreatening conversation to allay the owners fears that we were some city slickers.  We are not, we are North Country folk too and Kevin knows his mechanicals, trucks, etc. to dazzle any New England car/truck junky.  After a very short and amenable conversation the deal was struck, tools offered to assist us in the guard’s removal and within about 15 minutes the new rock guard was being hoisted by Kevin and I into our Suburban.  Reddy our Cavalier Spaniel who had come along for the ride was not quite sure what this big canopy was coming over top her bed!

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This ends Part 1 of our ROCK GUARD RESCUE.

BUT THERE’S MORE LUCK TO BE FOUND!  Never underestimate what gems you may find on a Sunday drive!

Not more than 15 minutes down the road from rescuing this rock guard did we see a much earlier Avion (can you spot it in first photo below?) at a horse show along the road.

We veered quickly there to see that too!  And to our sheer delight, it belonged to a woman who ran a mobile embroidery business who was actually based out of CT.  Turns out it was a 1974, 23′ Travelcade. She had pretty much gutted the inside but had done some tasteful redecorating in prep for her boutique.

She was making custom designed hats, shirts, jackets for the horsey set.  She needed an awning for her new Avion soon to be traveling boutique on wheels.  Perfect!  We struck a deal to trade our old Carefree Awning system hardware for some custom designed clothing using our trademarked Avion artwork that we had commissioned an artist to do for us in 2017.  This was truly our double lucky day!

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My next post will be on the Rehab phase! Until then…safe journeys!

Luisa

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Sharing Holiday Joy from NY to AZ!

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Along the way of our past six years of researching, planning and dreaming about our eventual “full time RV life” we have enjoyed and learned from many who have taken the plunge before us!

Among those who we respect and have learned from the most are a handful which include at top of our list, Steve & Courtney from AStreaminLife.

We have followed their journey from their initial change of lifestyle decision, to sale of their house, to downsize and deciding what trailer to get (Courtney was totally new to camping and RV life while Steve had grown up with parents who RV’d tons!) , to their first year commuting daily from full time RV living in a local KOA campground in Tucson AZ,  but keeping their day jobs…..to their first years + now full time on the road.

Each episode they post on YouTube we learn something, laugh (at sometimes Steve’s dry humor jokes) share similar likes, dislikes and we know we are far more better equipped when our day comes because of them and others who have taken the journey and are willing to share their successes, failures and “whoops” candidly and honestly.

For more information about AStreaminLife  visit their full website too!  link

So this year, in the season of thanksgiving for many blessings we have, we also wanted to let Steve and Courtney know how much we have appreciated their friendship and effort to allow viewers like us to be included in their daily life.  We knew they were going to be coming up to the ADK’s hopefully this summer and that they loved to visit and film waterfalls.  Well, we know the DACKS are full of neat spots but knowing Courtney loves the “epic planning” part of their trips we sent a Christmas present to them in Scottsdale AZ where they were going to be celebrating with Courtney’s folks over Christmas time.  Included in our gift to them was a travel guide to ADK waterfalls, and each of them got a pair of socks befitting to their lifestyle and their tastes.  Steve’s socks were a custom beer bottle (he loves craft beer and breweries just like Kevin does!) and for Courtney I picked out a pair of socks that had a camping theme complete with trailer, campfire, etc.   It appears they loved them and we are so happy for that!

Here is a clip of their Scottsdale AZ video published on their YouTube Channel.  Specific reference to receiving our Christmas present socks (and showing them off) is at about 5:47 minutes in–HOW SWEET OF THEM TO THANK US IN THIS VERY PUBLIC WAY!  WOW-did not expect that and they have over 11K YouTube followers!!  Please watch the whole video (and their other videos on early retirement how to and RV living and travels to magnificent places in the USA!) so you can learn more about who they are and you will see why we enjoy following them on their journey so much. Better yet!  subscribe to their YouTube Channel and see the many valuable and educational videos they have posted from selecting a generator, to downsizing tips, to finding the perfect campground…or the not to perfect dip into a BLM spot that got them stuck AND cost them a portion of an underbelly pan which had to be repaired!

BTW- they typically camp in exactly the same kind of BLM and private campgrounds that we know we plan to go to as well…over this Christmas ’18 they are in Cave Creek which is a town Kevin and I have spent quite a bit of time in already as it is only about 35 minutes north of where my son David lives with his wife Bri.  Kevin and I had already checked out and put the campground in Cave Creek (Cave Creek Canyone road below) on our list of must stays.

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Happy New Year Everyone!

Kevin & Luisa Sherman, The Pewter Palace

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Keeping RV Cabinetry in Tip Top Shape

There is no doubt that one of the key features of vintage trailers is their craftsmanship and quality of products/materials.  Later in this post I will talk about what we do to maintain our cabinetry so well, but first, a little history and photos.

The Avion Coach Company spared no expense when manufacturing their signature aluminum trailers prior to the late 1970’s.  Given the price tag at the time, these beauties were high end, luxury trailers.   It was after that time that the company was sold to the Fleetwood RV company and incrementally over subsequent years the quality and craftsmanship started to wane.  For more history about the Avion Corporation we highly recommend purchasing Bob Muncy’s book shown here.  There is a link to how to purchase on our resources page.

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Our 1973 is considered by many articles we have seen to be in the “perfect window years” of style, amenities and design of the Avion Coach Company.  Truthfully, many prefer the pre-1973 models which have more rounded, Airstream-type styling (photo below left) with more front/rear fan panels—but in 1973 when they changed to our “breadloaf” front and rear (ours at photo below right) you gained some really valuable headspace and storage inside and more room to move about in the rear bathroom.

 

One of the things however that did not change during these pre- late 70’s years and even into the 80’s at least was the superb quality of their use of real wood and excellent craftsmanship of their cabinetry.   Real hinges on drawers, metal tracks and wheels.  Full length piano hinges on all tall cabinets and closet doors are all standard.  Our LaGrande model has the extra French Provincial molding and flourish handle pulls (our kitchen cabinet below).  The more basic, entry level trailer, The Travelcader, and Sportsman models had plain fronts and simple pulls.

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Now owners of Avion’s are tasked with maintaining the condition of these beautiful wood cabinets.  Some have chosen to paint over the stained finish-perhaps because of worn, dried out condition of their trailer, others because there is a growing preference especially among Millennials to have a crisp, bright, clean look so white or pale grey painted cabinets seem to be the rage.  Below is a great beautiful example of a more “modern 21st century look” recently put on one of our Avion Facebook forums.  It is a very, very nice look but not one that we would feel comfy in for any full time living.  It always amazes me how varied style  interiors each Avion owner does with their trailer.  We are all starting with basically the same bones!

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For us traditionalists, we relish the mellowed wood stain of our cabinets and do all we can to ensure they stay that way.  Look at the difference!  Only you can decide for your personal style which you prefer!

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Now, about keeping up this stained cabinetry.

Each spring, we wipe over all of the wood cabinetry, closet doors inside and out with “Restor-A-Finish” oil by a company called Howard.  Here is the link to it on Amazon, but they also have other colors available too like Cherry and others.  One can has now lasted me two complete seasons.  I did go over the cabinets this fall again because we had used the trailer more this season and they just seemed to need a bit more.  We purchased this Restor-A-Finish can at our local large Antique Co-op Shop (Glenwood Antiques in Queensbury, NY)  and it is something that many antique dealers use routinely on furniture.  It does come in a variety of stain colors and we found that the Maple-Pine was the closest match to our cabinets.  The Avion Corp. did offer a few different finish colors so some interiors are going to be different than ours, lighter, or darker.  The wood is birch with beautiful grain as you can see from our photos.

I use an old Tee shirt or other smooth rag to apply the oil.  Careful…it is quite thin and runny!

It does go on somewhat oily but that is fine and over a day or two it penetrates in and rejuvenates the wood.  There is no need to go back over it with a dry cloth.  Let the oil soak in. What I do like is that it does NOT leave a sticky film like some other furniture oils do.  The smell is not bad and it does wash off your hands fairly easy with a scrubby but I do try to wear rubber gloves when applying it because it will stain your fingernails a bit for a time afterwards.

I like that it is a little shiny when being applied because it allows me to more easily see where i have daubed and where I have not.  I have also used this same restorer if we had a scratch accidentally onto a cabinet door or trim piece.  It covers it beautifully!

Here is a perfect photo to show the treated cabinet on left, and not-yet-treated on right:

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In conclusion, we would highly recommend Restor-A-Finish for refurbishing your wood stained cabinetry and maintaining its vibrancy and condition by using it at least annually.  We have seen photos of Avion and other RV interiors where the cabinets were not treated regularly and what happens is that they get brittle, chip, peel and look washed out and faded.

So please give treat your wood cabinets to a luscious spa treatment to keep them in beautiful condition always!

See you on the road!  One Life….Live It!!

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Kevin & Luisa Sherman ~ The Pewter Palace

Winterization, Our Tips and Tricks for Avion Hibernation

It’s that time of year that I am beginning to dread more and more each year….winter is coming!   It is marked by falling leaves, the need to start our car for a few minutes to “burn” off the frost from the windshield and now this weekend….the proverbial need to ready our Pewter Palace for the coming of the winter hibernation.

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This is a photo of the first November we owned our 1973 Avion when we had not brought her to the inside storage yet.  It is recommended by many who own Aluminum trailers to NOT cover them!

Eventually, when we retire we will be doing the “Chasing 70” dance- which for those in the know..is traveling to anywhere and everywhere that it is in the ranges of the 70-78 degree weather around the USA.  Sure we have some specific places picked out like AZ (photo to right)

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I took this photo from about 1 hr north of where my Son and his beautiful wife life north of Phoenix.  It was early October. Can I handle seeing this kind of view out my door each day…you Bet!

and western CA along the Colorado River area and maybe an occasional trip to Fort Wilderness Campground in Orlando for a Disney Holiday fix—but for the most part our map is open to ideas for where to spend our winter months from Nov 1 to May 1 (at least!)

 

But for now…it is a process of putting our Avion snug in “the carriage barn” ( our rented RV storage unit) which keeps her high and dry, away from the elements of snow, ice, and sleet.  BTW for those of you who are contemplating an aluminum beauty, be it an Avion or our cousin the Airstream—please know that it is NOT recommended that these trailers be covered with the traditional RV cover sold at many camping supply and RV dealerships.  The covers can actually mar your aluminum finish and wreak havoc with your rig.  So owners basically have a few options:  they are “chase 70, put her into a garage/RV storage barn, or at minimum put your trailer under a strongly built pavilion/roof that will keep snow off the rig, but is open on the sides.

NOTE:  A simple search on Google will net you all sorts of “handy lists” in PDF etc that you can download and print off to do your check list to button up your rig for winter.  We recommend you check those out.  Perhaps even some of our fav bloggers may have some!

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So, the Pewter Palace is being prepped for winter this weekend and over this coming week.  Here are the basic steps we do and then some of my videos will go into a little more details both inside and out.

  1.  Shut off ByPass to the Hot Water Heater. Lift up the “blow off valve” and get a 5-gal pail and put underneath and unscrew the plug and let hot water heater completely drain out.
  2. Go to the city water and using my air chuck threaded for the water line hook that up.  Use an, oil-less portable air compressor to blow all the water out of the lines.  Kevin set’s it at 30lbs of pressure to blow out the water from all the lines.
  3. Open all faucets and keep them open
  4. Push the pedal and the spray nozzle in the toilet, and also shower head to be sure all water is drained out completely.
  5. Pour RV (pink) antifreeze into toilet bowl , and all other drains including the shower, kitchen and bath sinks and then be sure to pour at least a few inches of antifreeze into the toilet bowl when closed and check the bowl for evaporation over the winter as you want that liquid to be in the bowl to keep the seals moist.
  6. We leave all the faucets open all winter, all low drains open, holding tanks are drained.
  7. Outside, he gets is 2 foot extension for the sewer line and his yucky 5-gal pail and he pulls the black line let it drain out any remaining.  Shut and then do grey water whatever may be remaining.  Take this and dump it.  He takes a little bottle of water and bleach solution to clean the bucket and then store.
  8. Then disconnect the two foot sewer host, spray off with bleach and water solution and let dry.
  9. Put on a winter cap on to the sewer connect.  (he has drilled a few small holes in it for ventilation but small enough that no critters can get in).  It is suggested to spray the black and grey sewer valves and push in and out a few times to lubricate.  We keep our valves out and open to allow air flow.  Our tanks don’t stink at this point!  (also as side note, we highly recommend UNIQUE brand RV Digester.  Check out all about that here in one of our past blog posts:  Its All About the BLACK TANK!

MOVING INSIDE:

Inside is a bit more my domain for winter-ization.  Its become pretty routine now and here is what I do in some basic steps:

  1.  Remove all liquid products (again, our garage is great and secure but NOT heated!) from under the kitchen sink, bathroom sink and also the bathroom closet.  Use them over the winter at home or place in storage closet at home where they can hibernate too till spring!
  2. Remove all food stuffs, spices and anything remotely food like from the rig.  Anything that could even remotely explode with freezing temps, or whose scent might be attractive to starving varmints.
  3. Wipe down the inside of the refrigerator AND freezer area with a mild cleanser that does include either bleach or at least an antibacterial cleaning solution to ensure you have a squeaky clean fridge.  Use some sort of block/holder to keep the doors open for the winter storage time.  Do not let them close! Pool noodles work well.  We already had one of the hard plastic ones from Camping World so use that.  I actually think the pool noodles are better, that hard plastic thing is easy to knock out by accident!
  4. Strip beds, clean all bed linens and place all sheets and blankets from beds into scented (we use Febreeze scented lavender) draw string kitchen trash bags and label if needed.
  5. Lift bed mattresses and dinette seat cushions up on their side to allow air flow in and around them thereby reducing chances of any mold and also critters getting more room to hibernate in darkness.  We store the scented bagged linens on wood part of bunks next to the mattresses.

Here is a brief video to show this part of the winter storage technique.

4.  I then take BOUNCE brand fully scented (knock off brands do not work…we have tried2018-10-21-13-53-39.jpg them!) and I place at least two in each cupboard including under sinks, in pantry area, in clothing and bath closets, around toilet area.  I also place them in and around all the mattresses, bagged linens, dinette cushions, etc.  There are varying reports of these working but I know from over 7 years of experience they have worked for us.  We also use them for decades when we are reenacting camping on our tent floor cloth and under our cots and bedding to keep insects, mosquitoes, beetles, spiders, snakes etc out of our tent…and it definitely works for that too!

 

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5.  In the bathroom closet I pay extra attention (and more Bounce sheets) because this is where some of our exterior systems/hoses are coming in to the rig.  Including where our power box is on outside and near where the sewer intakes, etc are).  Here you will see where not only have I put Bounce sheets all over the floor and shelves but I have also hung a store bought (from Vermont Country Store) Mouse deterrent herbal bag.  It says it lasts a few months.  I have not used this specific brand but it says that it is good for nearly 100 sq feet–so with this cabinet shut it will more than do this bathroom area!

We do not use any snatch & kill traps because the whole idea is that we do not want them even coming in…(I do not want a rotting dead mouse inside over 5 months!)  We DO have some of those black box traps for mice and rats on the cement floor in the garage with poison in them.  We have seen evidence of some nibbles eating the poison but no dead carcasses in the traps themselves- I guess word has spread that our “restaurant” serves bad food!  LOL

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6.  Lastly, a few other places on the outside to  put Bounce sheets.  We put a few in ALL of our exterior storage bins and also most definitely in our exterior sewer area, power box and also hot water heater compartment area.  Again, these are all areas where there is a potential for a varmint to shimmy through even the smallest of openings-they only need the size of a penny or dime to get through!

Last but not least, give your rig a really good vacuuming and wipe down all counter tops, table tops, bath fixtures etc.  I use Clorox Cleaning Cloths.

Some questions people ask…

Do you keep your “camping wardrobe” in the closets?  We do but again, there are Bounce sheets in all closet floors and shelves.  We also store smaller clothing items in plastic snap lid bins all the time above our bunks.  I have put Bounce sheets tucked in between totes and on lids here too.

Do you keep your pots and pans, cookie sheets,  and silverware onboard in winter? Yes, and we have always done this with no problem.  Obviously in spring if we see any sign of mouse droppings or nesting, then everything will get a full sterilization in our dishwasher at home, but otherwise just a good wipe down does the trick each spring.

Do we keep toilet paper and paper towels under RV sink cabinets.  NO!  we do not.  These items provide a huge attraction to varmints looking for nesting and bedding materials.  We take those paper products home and use them up over winter in our apartment.

Do we close our blinds and curtains.  NO we do not.  In fact, those of you who may have the day/night pull down fabric type shades your manufacturer may caution you not to do keep them down all the time.  It releases the factory pleating too much. But we  keep our curtains open during winter too.  Because our garage is dark, there is also no need for us to shelter our interior cushions, and linens from sunlight by having our curtains closed.

How important is it to have your tires up on board or something and not in contact with the cold driveway or dirt?  VERY!  For the best life and safety of your tires, please drive up on at least 1-2 inch thick boards.  We actually drive our rig up on those heavy industrial rubber mats that can be purchased at Lowes or HD.  They have holes in them, which allows for ventilation but also as Kevin notes, rubber to rubber is the best of all worlds.  You can see a little of the black mat in our video clip above.  We also keep these mats down all year because they make a great way for us to know exactly where the RV rear should be when backing in the trailer after a trip.  No guess work for me!

This year we are also going to be laying some LED warm white rope lights on under our rig to keep on 24/7.  We learned from Courtney & Steve of AStreaminLife.com that they have found that by putting some sort of illumination under their rig they have been spared from any mice infestations–even when camping in boondocking fields.  So since we do pay $15 extra per month for electricity in our storage garage, we will put these low voltage rope lights on.  We just purchased two spools in the lighting section of Lowes today (better quality than Xmas section). These are the kind and quality that store owners may purchase to go around their display windows, etc.  They were $38 for a 48 foot length.  We bought two so we can go just inside both wheels and full length and width of the rig with  no problem. We will use them on extended camping stays with power too.  For boondocking we will get four solar spot lights (tip from Steve and Courtney too!) so we still will have lights to ward off critters.  You do not want critters in your rig…ever!  Especially when it becomes your full time home.  See some yucky videos from both AStreaminLife and from LoLoHo bloggers on their issues with mice in their Airstreams. No fun!

That’s all we have time to share for now.  We will stop in and visit the Pewter Palace a few times over the winter months to check on her.

Safe Travels—–One Life….LIVE IT!

Kevin and Luisa Sherman

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Some of Our Favorite & Inspirational Bloggers/Vloggers for the RV Life

Over the last 9-10 years, Kevin and I have put considerable time into researching, planning and beginning to execute a thoughtful plan towards our goal of “going full time” RVing.  In this blog post we tell you about four of our most favorite RV bloggers/vloggers and include a little about them and links to their blogs and YouTube channels.  They are entertaining, inspirational, educational and oh yeah…..travel to amazing destinations!

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This is not our rig, but very similar to our first RV a 1998 Itasca Sunrise, 32′ Class A.  No slides, under powered, but wetted our appetite for more!

Originally and shortly after we sold our Class A 32′ motor home back in 2012 we realized then–after she was not in our driveway, how much we missed life on the road.  Albeit at that time, and it continues, we only get to do long weekends and the occasional big trip of a week or two around the eastern half of the USA but—each time we do we are more and more convinced this is the right path for us.    We also know it is not for everyone.

Along our journey we have found some truly inspirational friends in bloggers/vloggers who have chronicled their similar journeys from the decision to forego the traditional and head into the non-conventional life of making a rolling home….your only home.  We also have learned there are many variances in between this.  Some people live a portion of their year on their RV while returning to their sticks N bricks for the rest of the time.  More times than not, these are snowbirds who fly south in the winter RV in tow (or behind the wheel) and spend a warm and sunny February in FL, AZ or TX.

imagesThere are others who “escape” the brutal hot sizzling summers of those same places for their “camp in the northern woods, cottage on a New Hampshire lake or the beach family compound on Cape Cod or the rugged shores of Maine.  For many and varied reasons they prefer (or cannot quite imagine not having) a structure to call home base.

For us….that decision was easily made.  We did not want to be tied to the maintenance of our rolling home AND the maintenance, cost and distance filled with concerns about the safety, etc. of a northern sticks N bricks home base.  We would rather have what we own on our back so to speak and know that where ever we wanted to be…we would be and that could change from year to year, season to season depending on where the wind and whims blew us.  I personally have owned one home or another since 1982 and I am more than ready to not have that responsibility.  We simply do not want to deal with frozen pipes, switching out storm windows or raking leaves in our retirement years.  Been there….done that….done!

So we watched, learned, read, and chatted with many who have made similar decisions such as ours to “go full time”.  This is not a decision we have made on a whim.  But don’t be fooled, we have some family and friends who think we are nuts….and others-like my adult children….who are totally supportive and know we will succeed.

After being “RV-less” for about three years the itch became unbearable.  We started falling for Airstreams but did not want to do a total restore and ones in road worthy, camping shape were out of our price range.  Quite by accident we stumbled upon Avions.  Their iconic aluminum, rounded exteriors, quality interior and exterior build and their reputation for excellent tow-ability had us sold.  It took us another two years to find one we wanted….and although we had anticipated having to fly across the country to buy one, we found one on Craig’s List right in VT not more than 15 minutes from my daughter and son-in-law’s house!

IMG_1507168528568We purchased our 1973 Avion, 28′ LaGrande in September, 2016 (some Birthday gift for me eh??!!) and we have never have looked back.  Each month we grow more and more fond of her.  We sold our house in Oct. 2017 and moved into a townhouse apartment all under the methodical plan of incrementally doing our downsizing exercises in prep for full time RV life when we retire.

Below are a few of our very favorite bloggers/vloggers and for various reasons we have noted underneath each one.  Along the way we have internalized and put into practice some of their suggestions and methods, and in other cases it forced us to have heart to hearts with each other to realize….yeah, that may have worked for them…but we will be more comfortable doing it “our way”.  Watching literally hundreds of hours of YouTube videos (we subscribe to most of our fav’s so we don’t miss an episode) to reading countless articles and books on the topic….we have grown in our understanding of what life is like on the road…and what we as a couple expect from the journey, each other and life in general.  It has been a good way to learn…together to prepare for this next chapter.

Here are our favorite bloggers/vloggers.  They are not in any particular order because each offers us different windows on life on the road that are equally important in our planning phases.  You will notice a bit of a pattern here where 3 of our 4 fav’s are also Airstream owners.  Similar enough to our Avion…we all love round aluminum corners!  LOL

courtneyAndI-1A Streamin’ Life:  Steve and Courtney.  Now mid- 30-somethings who figured out a way to retire early (31 & 34) and we have followed since their decision to sell their two houses  a couple years ago (had recently married), sell their stuff, purchase an Airstream (an older one, 30′) and hit the road full time.  Both were still working the first year in their Airstream, living stationery in an RV park in Tucson, AZ while preparing their rig (and themselves) for hitting the road full time.  They are level headed, practical and very good money savers and managers.  Their blog is full of helpful videos on managing trip expenses, planning big trips and week long trips, downsizing to what is really needed and what is not.  They travel with their two dogs which also has given us tips on travel with our dog, Reddy as well.  Courtney and Steve are a terrific resource for how to determine your financial needs to go full time, save up for early retirement and more.  The recently launched a terrific online course to teach others how to plan Epic RV Adventures for more about that click here.   To check out more about Courtney & Steve and their adventures around the USA visit…..Their Blog/website     Their YouTube Channel

P1466425Less Junk, More Journey:  Marisa and Nathan.  Once again, these are “kids” as we refer to them as…basically Marisa is one year younger than my son, and Nathan is three years older than my daughter.  I am sure in some way I live vicariously through them and their journeys trying to imagine them as extended family.  Kevin and I will often refer to them as “the kids”.  Their blog has some terrific, easy to navigate pages like their FAQ that really gives you a terrific way to see their answers to many questions you may have about how they made their decision to go full time, steps they took, etc.  Their young daughter, Hensley is a year younger than our grandson Lucas and a year older than our grandson Sawyer.  She has been on the road since infancy and it is so fun to watch her explore, learn and travel with her fabulous, down to earth parents. Watching where they go, how Hensley enjoys it and some of their methods for keeping sanity on the road with a toddler has given us great ideas for when our grandsons are with us in our RV (it is our hope and plan that they will do more and more of it as we have more time to travel) Their Blog      Their YouTube Channel.

loloho rigLong, Long Honeymoon Kristy & Sean.  Also known as “Lo Lo Ho“.  What started out as a honeymoon on an RV has progressed into well over a decade of extended travels from this wonderful couple.  For over 12 years, Kristy and Sean have made dozens of highly informational videos on everything from backing into a campsite, to dissertations on generators,hitch locks, and many more pieces of equipment, etc. to their epic journey across Alaska (actually our other two bloggers have just done the Alaska trip now too in the last year!)  Last year, Sean was diagnosed with a cancerous brain tumor but with proper medical intervention and a bit of a slowing down of some of their multiple month trips he is fully on the mend with no tumor reported at his recent medical check up.  Wow! miracles do happen!  This couple maintains a bricks N sticks home and plans big trips each year to various parts of the USA from the Keys to Maine, from Seattle to Atlanta and everywhere in between.  Their video titles are well organized and were especially helpful when we first started RVing….they have some great tutorials to keep you out of trouble!  Their sense of humor and little bit of Laurel & Hardy type of format is so fun.  Sean’s writing style and sense of humor is unbeatable and Kristy is the perfect foil!  Their Blog    Their YouTube Channel

cherie and chris, technomadiaTechnoMadia:  Cherie and Chris.  These were one of the very first full time RV couples we found and began following. They are wanderlust spirits who travel the country in their upgraded retro vintage bus (yes, converted from a passenger tour bus).  Their specialty is their amazing knowledge of tech tools, internet on the road gear, trouble shooting electronics and over the years they have tested, reviewed and scoped out many pieces of internet and mobile gear that full timers may need or want.  A little over a year ago, Cherie and Chris decided to park their RV bus part of the year and bought a large trawler style yacht which they plan to do the “great loop” the Inter coastal Waterway around the eastern/central USA in sections over the next five years or so.  They are typically based in the FL area but also do presentations and speaking engagements at many large national rallies so they also travel all over.  They could be considered more of the senior statesman when it comes to full time life on the road, having done so for well over 15 years now.  They travel with Kiki their cat who is a star all on her own.  Their Blog   Their YouTube Channel

Summing it all up…..

We appreciate the time and talent that each of these bloggers/vloggers bring to the world of full time RV living or mega traveling.  Each of them share a candid snapshot all the time into their lives, their ups and downs, their triumphs and tribulations.  We have learned so much and not to seem like we are bragging but we sense we are far more informed that many other would be, soon to be, or already are..full time wanderers.  We owe this all to these folks and the many others who we watch from time to time on their blogs. We follow or at least check in with about a dozen RV couples and singles who focus on various subjects.   We simply wanted to highlight the top four that we follow…otherwise this blog post would be longer than it already is!! LOL

Thanks for tuning in.  Please visit our friends above. and PLEASE……Let them know that Kevin and Luisa Sherman from “The Pewter Palace.com” turned you on to them!

Safe travels and please subscribe to our blog so you don’t miss a another post!

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Luisa and Kevin Sherman- ThePewterPalace.com

Campground Review: Village at Turning Stone RV Park, Verona NY

October 2018– We have just come back from a five-night stay at the Villages at Turning Stone RV campground which is owned by the Oneida Indian Nation who operate the Turning Stone Casino and Event Center complex a half mile down the road. I have a nice short video further down in this blog post that will give you a great idea of what the individual sites look like!

I have posted a very comprehensive review on one of our favorite campground review sites of which I am a member–CAMPENDIUM.COM. You do not need to be a member to check out reviews…only to post them!

Here is the link for my review of the Villages at Turning Stone RV Campground.

I have gone to Turning Stone each fall for the last three years for a convention for work and I have to say this was by far the most enjoyable stay yet! I loved being able to cozy up in my bathrobe by the open campfire at night after being in windowless conference rooms all day! Plus it saved a boat load of $$.

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BEST fire ring ever!!

The RV park is very affordable (our rate, $39.95 including taxes with Good Sam discount) at this time of year. This was for a full hook up paved site overlooking one of their small ponds with tons of room and privacy. Cable TV and very decent internet service.

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PLUS BONUS!! they offer their campers access to their 24/7 shuttle service to get you back and forth to the casino/hotel/convention center complex. More about this in my Campendium review (see link at end of post). So you can gamble (if you like that, sorry but we do not) and go to their restaurants (The Tin Rooster BBQ Restaurant -below photo-has a full size vintage Airstream International inside fitted up with lounge seats for drinks and snacks you can sit in!),

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live shows, cafes, bars/nite clubs etc and never have to drive no matter what time of day or night. They make it easy with a phone call or via the main valet at the casino. They picked me up right at the end of our loop driveway every morning to go to my sessions.

There is not a lot else to do in the immediate area. Rome has good history, Fort Stanwix National Historical Park is there with large recreated fort and wonderful visitor center. Rome also has movie theaters, live theater, restaurants, shopping, etc. and is less than 20 minutes away by car.

We stayed in Loop 100 (1) and site 121 which was awesome, wide and private and backed up to the boat pond area.

Here is a video shot from our campsite.

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Please check out my full review on Campendium so you can also see photos of the bath houses, showers, common buildings, and more. We definitely will be back to this RV park in the future. Oh…by the way, visit my review to hear about the train!

Happy travels from Kevin and Luisa in the Pewter Palace!

One Life….Live it!

Inexpensive Handy Counter Extension Project-Under $30 in Under 30 Minutes

We love our Avion, but lets face it, at under 200 sq. feet there is precious space for everything!  Our kitchen is no exception.  By the way….did  you know that in some of the original sales brochures we have seen for ’70’s era Avion’s they called the kitchen/galley the “entertainment center”!  What a hoot!  I figure that is because many women during that time were stay at home wives and mothers and spent a lot of time in the “kitchen” so when it was time to get away in their Avion and travel they were “entertaining”, not slaving in the kitchen!  

So back to our project!  Our front area had been altered from a jack knife sofa to a banquette dinette area by the previous owner as I have mentioned in previous posts.  So we were without the small angle/corner cabinet at the end of the kitchen counter area to the right of the kitchen window.  We have found a perfect (love it!!) covered ottoman/box (see photo at end of this post) that serves as storage, a footrest and as a spare seat if needed inside or outside.  But the ottoman is low and does not help with needed counter space.

Items and tools you will need:

  • wood snack table that measures no more than depth of your base cabinet
  • pencil or marking device
  • paper for hinge template
  • locking hinges and screws (be sure they are not too long and would poke through tray table top!)
  • scrap board for backing support
  • power drill and screwdriver
  • tape measure
  • small level
  • A “helper” helps!

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  DEAD SPACE is ABOVE

I had seen on many other RV videos where many B+ and others have installed the flip up extension to their counter with locking hinges.  I decided that we no longer needed four wood snack tables at our apartment (just two of us anyway!) so I decided on re-purposing a solid wood snack table top for our Avion’s kitchen counter extension.

I purchased two of the brown locking hinges at our local Albany RV supply store for under $10 each.  I like the way the brown blended into the cabinetry and also the fact that they are lockable is very important so once the extension is tilted up and deployed it stays put.  Be sure when you are installing them that you are putting the correct long side on the top so that when you want to fold the table extension back down you are gently lifting up a little to disengage the lock and then lower the extension.  I have found some similar on Amazon, linked here but the locking mechanism is a bit different than ours.  There are plenty of types and colors available on Amazon but oddly, no brown.  I like our brown with our trailer.

We used the side that shows on top in photo below as our “top” which got secured to the underside of the tray table top.

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Tray Table Stand:  After gathering needed supplies we proceeded to un-attach the wood snack tray top from its wooden scissor “X” stand.  Our snack trays had been purchased from Walmart years ago but I believe they still have them.  Going onto Walmart.com now I see only sold in a four piece set with holder for about $60.  But I believe our local Walmart store sells them in person as singles and price is under $10 each.  Here is a link to one on Amazon that is similar in style to what we used in case you want that as reference.

Once tray top was on its own we decided exactly where to locate it on the base cabinet end wall.  This wall is solid wood (Avion cabinetry is gorgeous and real….no particle board on these beauties!) but nevertheless we still will put a scrap board behind to give the screws/hinge/extension table and this cabinet board further vertical support.  I decided not to try to make the extension flush with the kitchen counter.  This is both for aesthetics and to be able to keep edges clean, but also because I did not want to risk the tray extension ending up even a tad higher than the counter when we were fixing in place. Below you can see the horizontal pencil line which we marked while laying the extension against the cabinet base wall.  Also note the pilot holes drilled after positioning the first of the two hinges. (you can see faint remnants of a line where the original corner cabinet was installed a little further down)

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Below are photos showing the scrap board we used behind where we would be drilling and then screwing in the bracket hinges.  This provides great extra support.  The scrap wood does not impede the drawers from closing.  Be sure to use a thin enough piece so the drawers still go in but sturdy enough to be a reinforcement for the hinges.  Use your measurements on the outside to then draw your measurement/placement for the scrap wood on the inside of the cabinet wall.

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Use your level to ensure you are positioning the hinges level so that your extension is level too!  We did pilot holes through the cabinet base and directly into the scrap wood. This is where the helper comes in because someone has to hold the vertical scrap boards in place while the hinges are being drilled in.  You can use double face tape, etc. to hold them in place if you do not have a helper.

In order to be sure that we had the position of the holes for the hinges correctly placed on the underside of the extension table, we made a paper template up.

Once the hinges are on, and you have your template ready, you are ready to drill pilot holes into the underside of the snack tray table.  Here is a great trick (see video below) Kevin used to be sure that he did not drill into tray table any further than needed and poke through the top by accident.  Just a little strip of duct tape put around the drill bit at the bottom most measurement needed for the screws so that the screws would secure through the hinge and into the table extension without poking through.

Once all pilot holes are drilled, once again here is where a helper comes in handy.  Place the extension tray table top onto the first hinge.  We started with front most hinge and insert screws from underside and up into the tray table top.  Then do back hinge.  It helps to have someone holding onto the tray table and exerting just a little downward pressure on the extension table top to ensure a good bond.

What I like most about using the already finished tray table is that it gives an immediate finished look unlike if you just slapped a pine or square sided oak board there.  These tray tables are built to handle dishes, water, food being dropped on them, beverage glasses sweating onto them.  They are pre-finished, solid and have held up for over 10 years and still look nearly new for us!

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Here is a photo (above) of the finished project with the extension down.  You can also see we measured and positioned it optimally so that it did not impede me being able to pull out and get into the storage ottoman either.  We are really, really happy that we have just DOUBLED our useable counter space for the cost of under $30 and about a half hour of project time work.  Can you tell by the video that I am really excited!!

Let us know if you take on this project for your RV so we can post it on our facebook page and share your results with others to inspire them!

VIDEO OF THE FINISHED PROJECT!  SO EXCITED!!

Safe journeys!  Remember if you do this or a similar counter extension project let us know!

—Luisa and Kevin

1973 Avion, LaGrande, 28 foot

“One Life… Live it!”

Sept. 2018-Northeastern Annual Tin Can Tourist Rally

Sampson State Park, Romulus, NY was once again the site of the Annual Northeastern Tin Can Tourist Rally September 12-15, 2018.  This was our second year attending and we were fortunate to have Thursday as our travel day this year so we could enjoy the evening festivities that night AND be able to select an awesome campsite more in the “hub” of the action.

(Avioners sure to read all the way to the end to see photos of fellow Avions at the rally too!)

Reddy helped co-pilot…of course!  (ha ha- you should have heard her snoring!)2018-09-16 11.57.27

 

We arrived (after a five hour trip) at around 1:30 PM and selected site #53 this year.  It was a great choice because we could park parallel to the street, be more in the center 2018-09-14 09.05.59hub and also an quick walk down the slope to the concert and happy hour tent and bathroom building (which saves on black water tank use) since this state campground only provides electric hook ups.  They have a communal dump station and fresh water fill at end of campground drive.  More about that later in another post.

Sampson State Park Virtual Tour

Towing this 28 foot Avion is a breeze.  Kevin continues to remark how you hardly know it is there.  We average a cruising speed of 60 mph which we feel is safe and comfortable for us, our truck and the trailer. The weather was warm, mid to high 80’s and expected to  be that for the entire weekend which for this time of year is very warm.  We like 70’s thank you!!

Once at the campground Kevin proceeded with his normal set up routine and I with mine.  I have the responsibility of decor, outside amenities and helping with the flag install.  This was the first time we were officially using our new flag holder which holds 5 flags.  Sadly not all of the ones we ordered came in on time, but we did have our American Flag and our TCT (Tin Can Tourist) flags.  I will be doing a specific post on how we repurposed things from Lowe’s to make our flagpoles since the cost of ready made ones were crazy expensive!

Many of the vintage campers had already come in and more rolled in as we were setting up our campsite.  Here are some great photos!

 

These rallies are chocked full of great people and many opportunities to socialize and get to know each other, and their RV’s better.  Rarely can you take your pet for a walk, or saunter to the Rec Hall or lavatory without sparking up a conversation with someone else who is passionate about their vintage rig.  We feel right at home!

Thursday evening we had a pizza party in the Rec Hall which is reserved exclusively for our TCT group use all weekend.  Yes, we indulged in Pizza and it was yummy and plenty pot luck salads and desserts! (these “canners” know how to party and cook!) We also indoctrinated several new TCT members (flash back for me how i totally messed up the theme song last year when we were newbies!)  Everyone had a blast!

Friday morning was a coffee and donut informal gathering back at the Rec Hall.  These are always great ways to move around, sit with different people and share tips, travels and tales about vintage RVing.  Friday and Saturday we also were each allowed to have a “flea market table” at our sites if we wanted to.  Luck will have it we still have plenty to sell and were able to sell quite a bit of stuff which essentially paid for our entire trip!  Nice!!  and it clears out more from our RV garage and home that we need to downsize.

Friday night there was a happy hour under the huge social tent which is set up in the middle of the campground making it easy for everyone to get to.  (it is also next to the bathroom pavilion which is doubly handy cause lets face it, there is quite a bit of libations flowing!   Happy Hour was at 5 PM with pot luck appetizers.  I made cantalope melon bites wrapped in prosciutto then put on skewers with mozzarella balls, and a sprig of fresh mint.  Then laced with Balsamic glaze, these little beauties were gobbled up by the over 30 attendees in a heartbeat.  They were yummy and perfect for a warm, very warm September evening.  A little later we all strolled en-mass up to the Rec Hall at 6 PM for the Famous Mac N Cheese and Chili Cookoff Dinner competition.  I did not partake in 2018-09-15 17.38.08competing this year, but I brought a tossed salad.  Once again, the wonderful food selections were amazing and plentiful with 13 varieties of homemade chili and nearly that many Mac N Cheese casseroles.  Add to that tons of various salads and a whole table of desserts and no one would go “home” hungry!  We sure did not!  It is so great not having to plan to make all your own meals for four days!  Wow!

Friday night beginning at 7 PM there was a great bluegrass four piece live band under the social tent.  We went close by for a while then moved up to our camper and could enjoy the great music wafting over the lawn while stoking up our own nice campfire.  We were only perhaps 100 feet from the tent so it was like our own private concert.  We were tired after a full day of flea market sales and giving tours!

(this photo above is actually Saturday night’s impromptu Happy Hour , not on the schedule but we all said….”why not”??!!

You are beginning to see a theme here…..Canners like to party…and EAT! (did I forget to mention that at every evening meal and happy hour there is wine and other non alcoholic beverages!)

 

Saturday was no exception, first a pancake breakfast in the Rec hall, Come dressed in your favorite RV Jammies contest!…… then Saturday night the catered Chicken BBQ with again a myriad of pot luck dishes and desserts.  Check out these photos above!

In between during the day on Saturday we all hosted three hours of an OPEN HOUSE TOUR where most of us have our trailers or RVs open for public visitors and fellow canners to tour, talk with the owners and share stories.  I did not count how many visitors we had but it had to be at least 80 people.  Some were vintage camper owners who had gotten nixed out of being in the TCT loop because the event sold out this year in 31 minutes!  Next year, there is talk to expand into a second loop at the campground so more TCT member can get in on all the special events, etc. that comes with your official TCT event registration package.  That would be good.

One outstanding RV this year was just two sites away from us.  Called “THE ROCKET” this 42 foot 1956 trailer is right out of an I Love Lucy story!  Check out these photos.  This was a “field find” with trees and yuck growing out of every crevasse and has been completely and faithfully restored and used quite regularly for camping.  It was set up in a Christmas theme this year and totally awesome!

 

Saturday night was capped off with the awards for Best Lights, Best of Show and Best PJ’s awards being given out at the Chicken BBQ dinner.  Fun times and great conversation!

Below is the vintage Airstream that won Best in Show….beautifully restored we believe the owners are from Canada.  As participants we do get a list of everyone who has attended with their year of rig, name, address and email so we can keep in touch.  Nice again!

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Sunday we decided to loaf around our camp in the morning and cooked breakfast (our favorite meal when camping) and savored a beautiful morning having breakfast in our PJ’s at our picnic table.  I love morning coffee, etc. outdoors….so nice! By 11 AM most were leaving and so were we.  We stopped at the campground at Turning Stone Casino in Verona on our way back to scope out our reservations for the end of the month….we will be out camping again from Sept 28-Oct 5 while I attend a convention at the Casino event center.

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I would be remiss without thanking publicly Ed and Miriam Moore who have orchestrated and coordinated this rally for at least the last 5-8 years.  They are lovely folks who try and succeed so well to make everyone happy and to plan so many great aspects of this rally.  The Moore’s announced they are retiring from coordinating after this year and their successor has yet to be announced, but will have big shoes to fill.  It will be nice for Ed and Miriam to be able to actually fully enjoy just being participants next year!

I HAVE SAVED THE BEST FOR LAST!   There were FOUR (including us) Avioner couples present at this years TCT Rally and we understand next year a few more are going to make every effort to attend.  Since this is an Avion blog I will leave you with the photos of our Avion buddies at the rally!

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John and Cindy Fisher, 20 foot Sportsman, from Crystal River, FL.  Spend summers in North East.
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Bill “Fletch” and Denise Fletcher, 1972, 28-foot LaGrande model.  Trumansburg NY
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Harry and Nancy James, 1965, H-24 from NY

So this draws to a close the fun time we had once again at the Northeastern Tin Can Tourist Rally at Sampson State Park.  Clearly as we get more time to travel we will make attending other TCT rallies in other states a priority.  We love the club and all it is about and encourage our fellow Vintage Camper lovers to get involved in TCT!

Here is a link to the Tin Can Tourist history

Replacing the Front Window Gasket (Glaze Bead)

Not the most “romantic” or instant joy repair….but a necessity for sure!

Our Avion had its rear side, kitchen and bath window’s re-glazed last June when at Fletcher’s RV Service in the Finger Lakes but they had forgotten to do the front when the rock guard was down.  UGH.  Similarly and much to our chagrin, when we were picking up our Avion at Cayo in MI  THIS June he told us he did not do it either because he did not have a source for the glaze bead.  (Had he told us that prior to us picking up our Avion assuming all of the punch list was done correctly—-and asked, we DID know the source, since we had ordered it for Fletch to install) DOUBLE UGH!

So anyway, long story short…our Pewter Palace still needed its front windows redone with new rubber window glaze bead.    And we decided after two failed attempts getting someone else to do it, we better just start learning to do way more for ourselves when it comes to working on this trailer.  Once we go full time, we are going to have to be far more self-reliant anyway.  This way we also only have ourselves to blame when “repairs” are not done correctly or fail shortly thereafter.

Back in early 2017—After conferring with multiple fellow Avion owners online we had found a reliable source in Interstate RV Metal Supply.  (they also sell other Hehr window parts, replacements, etc. and are very friendly and accommodating on the phone. ).  I will have other potential resource sites linked at end of this blog post in case you have a different style bead or different brand of vintage trailer.

www.InterstateMetalRVandsupply.com

Catalog # 009-344     1/8″ Glaze Bead.   PH 1-800-587-3463 or 503-786-8860

** they do not have a very online user-friendly site.  You do have to call them to order this product, but gladly, their customer service folks are wonderful.

This glaze bead comes in two colors–white and black.  We strongly recommend the BLACK because as you will see from our photos, once installed gives a nice finished look, will not get dirty looking and simply visually recesses and matches the windows rather than the white which we feel would stick out like a sore thumb against the aluminum skin of the trailers.

(left photo below is with old bead removed, right photo is after new bead put in)

So over Labor Day weekend, 2018…we labored!  And Bingo!….we managed to get all three of the front windows cleaned out of the old glaze bead (45 years later) removed.  It had to be done because it had shrunk considerably and the 45 degree angle cut corners had over 1 inch gaps between them where silicone had been slathed in to prevent water from seeping in and underneath.  The aluminum tracks had to be cleaned out of an over zealous black butyl tape that had been applied when the windows had been set in.  Major goo had oozed into the outside of the window edges and was underneath the window glaze.  The weather was warm, about 84 degrees with some humidity and this project DOES need to be done in warm weather so that the rubber glaze bead (both the existing you have to remove, and the new that needs to be installed) stays pliable and warm to make it easier to get in.

TIPS:

  • Use a cloth tape measure and generously measure your total lengths needed for each window.  Then at at least a foot for each window to ensure you have plenty!
  • Only do the install in warm weather and preferably with sun out and place the rubber glaze bead in the sun, on an asphalt drive if possible so it really warms up.
  • Remove the rock guard lock pin plates off front of window mullions first.  You may need a power drill with correct bit to get these off.
  • We suggest NOT using your old bead for measuring the length of your new bead.  The old bead may have shrunk and is not accurate measurement.
  • Apply the new bead in one length from your stock (in other words…do not precut what you think is your exact length needed for that window) and when getting close to your seam cut, cut it longer by at least 2 inches, then start trimming in until you have a really tight, snug fit.  Back it off a bit so the rubber is really tightly butting together.  This will reduce gaps in seams after a time where it is exposed to elements and starts to shrink from sunlight, etc.
  • Be sure to clean out the tracks really well once you remove the old bead.  Remove any dirt, bits of glue, Butyl tape ooze, silicone or anything that may impede the new bead being installed.  Use your toothbrush, plastic putty knife, plastic bone tool and scrubbies for this part of the job.

You may want to have the following pieces of equipment handy to help remove and to install the bead.

  1. Needle nose and flat nose pliers
  2. Sturdy scissors (for cutting the bead at 45 degree angle for any 90 degree window corners.
  3. Screw driver
  4. Old toothbrush (or the one you got from a hotel when you forgot yours!)
  5. Some plastic paint/putty knives, or better yet, a “bone tool” which is a hard plastic scraper type gizmo that is great for getting off the silicone or any other crud that may be on your aluminum skin.  The plastic bone tool will not scrape or mar your skin.  You can find a great bone tool on the amazon page of one of our favorite bloggers—Long Long Honeymoon (they have a vintage airstream)
  6. Set of Pick tools, (see photo of kit with blue handles, found at Home Depot, Lowes)
  7. Rags, scrubbies/we used Kevin’s GoJo brand cleaning wipes

Cleaning/Polishing the Front Windows—Plexiglas caution!!

We also took this opportunity to polish the front windows since they are Plexiglas and after 45 years have had their share of scratches, dirt and grime. BE CAREFUL WITH PLEXIGLAS!!!  you cannot use regular Windex or window cleaners on them!  Using the wrong stuff will result in a fogging and haze on the plastic window.  Yes, a former owner of our trailer neglected to remember this and our front left curved plexi window has that “fog” permanently and we will replace it at some point with new Lexan.  Just water is fine, but we have been using a cleaner especially formulated for Plexiglas that is available most anywhere other cleaners are found.  Ours is pink so you can really tell it is different than the traditional blue stuff that normally has ammonia or vinegar in it.

2018-09-02 12.58.44We used this plexiglas polish to do our windows.  We only used the foam pad, but the kit comes with various grits of sandpaper circles to use if you wish.  We did not attempt this because we were afraid of doing more damage to the hazy window and without having a replacement ready- we could not take the chance, two weeks from our Tin Can Tourist Rally trip.  But the polish paste worked well and did make a difference for sure so we are happy for now with the results.  We used a rechargable power drill and it worked great.

 

 

After the cleaning and polishing of the windows, here is the actual application of the rubber glaze bead.  Looks easy in video but takes a bit to get the “knack”.

 

The video’s kind of make this look easier than it is.  Just take your time, you will need strong, nimble fingers to do this.  I did not have enough strength in my fingers–but Kevin did!  Nice thing is that until you finish the corners or seams with a bit of Parbond sealant you can take it out and re position as needed till you get it right.

Be sure when you are putting it in that when in correctly it will be very snug and hold tight to the window itself.  If you see any bulge or gap, then it is not in properly so take back out that section and try again.

Seams: 

2018-09-02 15.32.39if you are doing your front windows your seams will be in the top and bottom of the vertical inside edges.  Whenever you have 90 degree corners you will need to cut your glaze bead at 45 degrees like a picture frame.   This is our first corner and before Parbond sealant is put in.  The rippling in corner is because Kevin was sure to really stuff as much of the rubber in as possible to avoid shrinkage issues later.

 

IF you are doing your side windows then it is recommended that you place your seam at the center bottom with a straight cut- butting the two ends together really tightly and firmly. Positioning your bead around rounded corners is not a problem but be sure you are not stretching it at all to get it in there, Kevin recommends pushing it back a bit even to ensure that there is no tension on the rubber glaze bead so that it does not want to pop out of the corners. (this was our first corner, not bad but we got better!)  This is before Parbond sealant was applied.

Some sites we saw did recommend putting a little silicone on the starting points and also on the corners.  We did not.  It might be something we regret, but as Kevin noted, he did really push back on the rubber as it was installed to be sure that there was no tension on the corners, etc.  We have seen where on other rigs that corners pull out when the shrinkage starts.  We do plan to apply some conditioner to this each year to keep it more pliable and soft and hopefully this will also reduce shrinkage.  We noticed that the glaze seams from where Fletch did the windows just over a year ago have already pulled apart perhaps an 1/8th inch.  We will place some more clear Parbond in those to reseal again.

FINAL STEPS IN THIS PROJECT:

2018-09-02 17.21.24 Sealing the seams of glaze bead:  After you have the bead in place and are pleased with the snug fit then put a bead of clear Parbond sealant over that seam.  We have not found Parbond in black which would have been our preference, but the clear basically works fine and the black glaze bead makes the clear look black anyway.  We purchase our Parbond from http://www.VintageTrailerSupply.com    We also use the hypodermic tube injectors that they sell on the same page since that does allow for better control of flow than direct from the tube of Parbond.  Parbond is great stuff to have around and is used many places on a trailer to prevent leaks, seal joints, etc.  It comes in clear and aluminum.  Cayo used aluminum stuff to block holes caused when we switched out our Carefree awning with our Zipdee.

Other possible sources for Avion Window supplies:

Replacement of some of these torque operators for our windows will be done in a future blog so keep and eye out for that soon!

 

 

 

So that is all for this project!  Hope your window re-glazing is successful!  Let us know!

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Picture of front window unit.  At this point, just the left curved window had been done and the old glaze bead removed from the center and right window and polishing had been done of the windows.

Campground “Scope Out” Missions

Maybe it is because we really would love to be camping every day if we could…but we are finding that when a weekend comes where we are “home-bound” we get antsy and all we seem to want to do is watch travel video’s, You Tubers who are living the full time life (oh we are so jealous!!!)…and plan for projects, trips AND CAMPGROUNDS that we want to bring our Pewter Palace to!

Some of these campgrounds are literally in our backyard.  We are fortunate to live just outside of NY’s Adirondack Park.  A public/private land mass of 6 million acres.  Much of it is designated Forever Wild, Wilderness Land and also there are vast tracks of beautiful woodlands, mountains, rivers, lakes and ponds.  Sounds heavenly?  it is!!

virtual tours link promo  check link here!

So this past weekend we hopped in the car (it was supposed to be rainy on Saturday anyway) and took off to explore about 2 hours north of us-some of the NY State Campgrounds to see what potential they may hold for our camping getaways…that are not too taxing on the budget or with limited time off.

Here is our check list to help you when deciding to check out campsites and campgrounds for future reference:

Before you start hunting for the PERFECT site in a campground scoping mission:

  1.  When to Scope?  Do  not go off season….go peak season so you can see what the campground is like in full swing!  If you are going to be there in slow or off season then it only gets better….not worse! (more on specifics to watch for later in this blog)
  2. Bring your camping guide book (I like to write directly in the margins what sites and comments we want to remember) and printed maps.  We have learned that there is very limited, if any cell coverage in the ADK areas where campgrounds are located so your GPS and ability to access their websites when on site is nil.
  3. Bring a pad and pen to jot down notes on things you observe along the way, restaurants that look good or that you stopped at for a meal and enjoyed.  Note interesting side trips or shops (for me its Antiques and Local Crafts!) along the way that you were unaware of.
  4. Note things like very steep inclines/declines getting into some places.  (Far easier to monitor this buzzing around in just your car than when towing your rig!)
  5. Bring a Tape Measure if you want.  Does not hurt to even bring a 50′ or longer (depending on your rig size) retractable tape measure if you really want to be sure you can fit your rig and park your tow vehicle in a site you have fallen in love with (of course, please do not do this if the site is taken when you visit—you might get some wild looks!)
  6. Stop at the ranger station, explain you are there to do a pre-camping check of sites to select a few that you would want to book in future.  Let them know what size/length rig you have so they can forewarn you if some areas are not for you.
  7. Pick up the site map at the ranger station, double check on their daily and weekly rates, length of max stay, and how far in advance you can book sites.  I say this because not all websites are always up to date.  NYS is pretty good and in fact they are doing some reconstruction of specific sites in every campground and have a list online as well as have them marked in the campgrounds–so you don’t get your heart set to find out its unavailable!
  8. REALLY IMPORTANT NOTE: you really cannot do this MISSION by yourself.  I have tried and it is really unsafe and not easy and far more time consuming. So grab a buddy and one of you drives and watches out for pedestrians, bike riders and pot holes and the other one of you read the map, jot down site numbers and orients the driver on where to turn next!

So we planned strategically, using the point to point method and we were going to follow a continuous path in a northerly direction checking out any and all state campgrounds along the way on our path.  We had two specific ones we had checked out online and they were the main target.  But we like free wheeling a bit too so we also planned for a few stops at shops, for dining and for any other private campgrounds along our way that seemed interesting.  For this trip, we were checking out specifically Lake Eaton and Fish Creek.

 

PREVIEW TIP- VLOGS, BLOGS AND PHOTO MONTAGES:

Many campgrounds, even state campgrounds have video’s on line now done by either amateur You Tube camping folks or in some cases by somewhat professional folks who have done a great job noting campsites themselves within parks.  Here are a few of our very favorite ones that we always preview ahead of doing any “Scope Mission”.  It is definitely worth the time to do!

VLOGGERS:  These Full Time RVers do great campground reviews and incorporate a terrific bike ride with Go-Pro style narrated tour of the campgrounds that they visit.  They travel all over the USA.

WheelingIt   (online and on YouTube)  Paul & Nina have now moved to Europe to begin RV adventures there, but their website remains an excellent resource of Vlog posts and videos from all over the USA.  They even did a review on Sampson State Park in NYS where our Tin Can Tourist Rally is each September!  Cheers!!

 

These folks are just one of many who do campground reviews, so just search You Tube for the campground you are thinking about and check out what shows up.

PHOTOS COLLECTIONS of campground actual # camp sites from around the country close up and by number for easy reference are awesome.  This site below is by far THE BEST resource to get a feel for campsites and to armchair surf specific campsites by Site # before you even go through the gate!  They categorize by public and private campgrounds, have numerous links, etc. and it is our GO TO site before we travel to anywhere with our camper.

Campsitephotos.com  (online and on You Tube)

Once You Are In the Campground:

  • What to look for…leave no rock un-turned!
  • What to avoid….
  • How to know what is best for you, your preferred camping experience
  • Trust your gut!

Again, be sure you have a buddy doing this with you so one can drive and the other is navigator.

What to Look For- Positives and Negatives–BE OBSERVANT!

  1. How friendly is the person staffing the entrance booth?
  2. What is the physical condition of buildings, pavilions, bath and shower houses?  If they are not maintained well, then chances are the campsites are not either.
  3. Is the signage directing you around the campground adequate?  one way roads to lessen traffic is always preferred.
  4. Check out the public spaces like beach, pavilions, communal fire pit, playgrounds.  Are they in good repair?  being used?  Dip your toe in the water, or at least look to see if it is a sandy beach or slimy.
  5. fish creek canoesIs there a boat or kayak access area?  Can you find a campsite waters edge and be able to launch your kayak right from there?  Boat rentals? Do they have life preservers available or do you have to bring your own?  Place to park your boat trailer if you are bringing one?  Fishing dock?
  6. Do they sell fishing licenses at office (NYS they do not so you have to purchase at a local store…how far away is that??)
  7. Visit at least ONE of the camper bath houses with toilets.  Are the flushable?  pit?  condition?  smell?  hot and cold water?  soap or at least sanitizer?  Bugs/spiders, critters?  ditto for the shower buildings- do they have lockable doors?  separate showers for each person?  or one room with stalls with curtains. (Lake Eaton, Fish Creek, Luzerne Campground and Scaroon Manor all had very nice to very decent facilities)
  8. Other campers…do they wave hello or at least a nod when you drive by them walking or in their sites?  no one wants an unfriendly campground—at least we do not.
  9. State campgrounds do not have planned activities for the most part but some will have specific scheduled nature talks or history walks by a camp host or ranger. Check into that.
  10. Dump Station.  Is it working?  easy to access with length of your rig?  away from where your campsite is….(wafting fumes is not our idea of a pleasant weekend!)
  11. Garbage Dumpster Area.  Is is cleaned up?  accessible?  do they recycle?  Some note in their rules they REQUIRE Clear bags!  remember to bring them!

 

What to AVOID!

roadwaysRig Length and Width:  We have a 28 foot bumper pull travel trailer.  Add to that our 3/4 Ton Pick Up Truck and we are over 50 feet in total length.  We are narrower than many modern rigs…only 8’5″ wide.  The size of your rig and total length needs to be an important consideration.

Campsite roadways and sites themselves:  As you drive through the campground, be very mindful of sharp turns, narrow roadways.  How are people parked?  Are tow vehicles left to park on side of the road because the sites are too shallow?  Are visitors cars to spend the day with camping friends making getting around the campground difficult?  Low hanging tree limbs??  (again we are far lower than most modern rigs so we always feel sorry for Class A’s and 5Vers because they are so tall and a ripped rubber roof is a real bummer!

lk E-typical campsite with car, pop up

LOOK FOR THESE CAMPSITE SPECIFICS:

A site that is on a bend in the road.  This site will be easier to back into because the angle of the road creates an automatic angle for backing in rather than having to angle your rid and tow vehicle.  You therefore can drive just past your site and then put her into reverse and back in nearly straight back.  We prefer sites on the right with the roadway bearing a curve to the left.  That’s just us and what we prefer.  Remember that angling may not always be possible due to trees, neighbors vehicles or a large rig parked in a site opposite yours.  MOST of the campsites we saw at four state campgrounds this weekend were back in sites with very narrow roadways.  Fifth wheels and motor homes have it a little easier with this, but at 50 feet in length for us and a bumper pull, maneuverability is key to getting into a site without pulling your hair out before you even get started camping!

Is the firepit/fire place and picnic table in good condition?  Not insurmountable but nice to have something useable.  We have had to balance our Weber grill on a boulder before because there was no where to put our grill.  And our evening fire was on the ground with that same boulder as a spark shield and backing plate.

What is the land like at the site?  Sand?  soft loamy mulch from leaf and bark rot?  What is the drainage pattern?  We find that going to look at sites right after there has been some really good rain is a great thing to do!  See which ones are in “flood zones” and avoid!  Are there a lot of rocks protruding up where you will be constantly going back and forth from your rig to your chair and tables??  that will wear you down, is a trip hazard and could also wreak havoc to your patio mat if you chose to put it down.  If sandy or soft, you may wish to bring a few boards to put under your leveling blocks and/or stabilizers.  This site below at Jellystone Campground in North Hudson NY was very sandy and after a week there, we had become slightly unlevel because of it despite having boards and levelers, pads.

2018-07-04 10.59.01Sun or Shade?  Which do you prefer?  We like trees but we also like to get sunlight through each day if the sun is shining.  We find that being in too dark of a site with tons of trees brings us into melancholia a bit, and also nothing ever dries out like swim suits, damp cushions or chairs, etc.  I also have solar powered fairy lights and other lanterns and without sunlight they will not work.  Also,  you run the risk of rolling up a damp awning.  Not good!

Room for your unhitched vehicle or visitor vehicle to be safely parked?  We have a long truck and always are sure to look where we can park our vehicle for easy access but also so that more times than not, it also provides a privacy screen for us from road noise.  Especially when we have the grand kids with us, we like to have a bit of a wall between the roadway and our “outdoor living room”.

Where is the Water?  Where are the Bathrooms?  always important to locate and see how far away they are from the site you are selecting.  All of the NYS campgrounds we visited (and most all others) have NO hook ups at all so you will be using a portable water jug to refill water tanks if needed or use from atop your picnic table and using the public toilets for “big business” to cut down on filling your waste water tanks too quickly.  You can also get one of those rolling portable honey wagon tanks and take that to the dump station.  We are going to look into this because we do plan to camp for a week or more and know that our black tank can only handle about 6 days if we use our camper bathroom exclusively.

Pine Pitch?  We try to avoid heavily wooded sites that are covered with pine trees. They leak sap onto your rig and your awning.

Low Hanging Limbs or dead limbs and trees (widow makers)– these may prevent your tall rig from fitting in, or any rig from being able to extend your awning.  Dead or rotted limbs or trees could be literally the downfall of your camping experience if they crash into your awning or worse…your rig!

How close is your neighbor?  We prefer ours way more than arms length.  There is a trend at private campgrounds to pack folks in like sardines.  Luckily, most state campgrounds that we have here in the ADK’s at least have very decent space and privacy between sites.  But always good practice to really see how close your neighboring sites are.  Again, our ideal site backs up to the woods, and has perhaps only one neighbor on our street side of the camper so we get the most privacy.  Not that we are not friendly, I just like to have my coffee in my bathrobe when camping!    Obviously if you are camping next to already known friends with their own camper then close is nice!

Cell Signal? is that a deal breaker for you?  check it out during your Scope Mission from a variety of sites that look good to you.  or is there a booster somewhere near the ranger station or public gathering areas- chances are no but worth checking out.  Along these lines, telephone??  we saw a good old fashioned telephone booth today at the Luzerne Campground.  You need to know how and who to reach in case of emergency.

campfireFire Wood Restrictions?  Bans?  in NYS you are only allowed to bring your own wood in from a max of 50 miles from the campground.  This has created quite the cottage industry for small time entrepreneurs who you will see dot the roadway leading to the campground entrance.  They often are selling a bundle of decent stuff for $3-7.  Stock up.  You can bring Kiln-dried wood with you from further away but it should say it is on the wrapping.  Also, when checking into your site day of your trip, be sure to be aware of any fire bans or restrictions due to dry conditions.  They normally have that posted at the gates.

S’Mores…..remember you cannot deface, remove or tamper with any trees in a state campground or most private ones…so bring your own S’More Sticks…and enjoy!

Hope this blog has been useful to you and welcome your tips and tricks to picking great campsites!

2017-09-17 10.41.56

Safe Journeys….ONE LIFE…LIVE IT!

Luisa

Adventures with a Vintage 1973 Avion Luxury Coach Camper